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Showing posts from March, 2013

Happy Easter

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Happy Easter, a photo by ricmcarthur on Flickr.

Blandings turtle

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Blandings turtle, a photo by ricmcarthur on Flickr. The Blandings turtle is endangered through out most of its range. It is about 8 inches long and has a bright yellow throat.

Emydoidea blandingii

in good hands

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in good hands, a photo by ricmcarthur on Flickr.
Ruby throat hummingbird rescued from water and brought in for rehab. After drying off and being kept warm, it ate and slept. It was released the following day.
Archilochus colubris

www.rondeauprovincialpark.ca



Chica-dee-dee-dee

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Chica-dee-dee-dee, a photo by ricmcarthur on Flickr. This black-capped chickadee is a name sayer.
He calls out a chick -a-dee-dee.
There is a secondary whistled call that I think sounds " he did it" (it wasn't me) " he did it"
Poecile atricapillus

Female northern cardinal

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Female northern cardinal, a photo by ricmcarthur on Flickr. Not as stunning as the male, the female is still a beautiful bird on her own.
Cardinalis cardinalis

Red-bellied woodpecker

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Red-bellied woodpecker, a photo by ricmcarthur on Flickr. You can actually see the red belly on this red-bellied woodpecker.
Even though it has red on its head it isn't a read-headed woodpecker, that name has already been used.
The red-bellied has a black and white pattern on its back with a reed cap and a white rump.
red covers both the crown and nape in the male and only the nape on the female.
They are common visitors to our feeders.
melanerpes carolinus

Peter,peter,peter

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Peter,peter,peter, a photo by ricmcarthur on Flickr. This tufted titmouse was singing his heart out.
Maybe spring isn't so far away. Calling for a mate or to defend territory, either way it is a sound of spring.
The call is a clear whistled chant : peter,peter,peter or here,here, here.
baeolophus bicolor

Peeking cat

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Peeking cat, a photo by ricmcarthur on Flickr. Not to be confused with Peking duck.
Oz loves boxes. Any shape or size, he just loves them and is in them as soon as you put it down.
Bags are good but boxes are better especially if they have lids.

Morning commute worsens at Rondeau

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Morning commute worsens at Rondeau, a photo by ricmcarthur on Flickr. Reports indicate that some drivers are being real turkeys about sharing the road.

Ruby crowned kinglet

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Ruby crowned kinglet, a photo by ricmcarthur on Flickr. You rarely see the ruby crown on this bird. It only shows when the bird is excited about something.
It is a small bird about 4 1/4 inches long and has a stuby tail.
This one came into our small water feature for a quick drink.

regulus calendula

Fifty shades of green

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Fifty shades of green, a photo by ricmcarthur on Flickr. This is a Where's Waldo type of photo.
Where's the frog(s)?

Soft shelled turtle

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Soft shelled turtle, a photo by ricmcarthur on Flickr. As with most turtles in Ontario the soft-shelled turtle is endangered.
In certain areas they are fairly common but only in a few areas.
This turtle was confiscated when the owners tried to sell it.
It now has a home at the visitor centre at Rondeau Provincial Park.
Apalone spinifera

Get in line boys.

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Winged Giants
Tundra swans are very large birds with wing spans in excess of 6 feet. They are about 5 feet tall and weigh about 16 pounds.
The swans have returned in large numbers to the Rondeau area.
They are on their annual migration to the high arctic breeding grounds.
The Friends of Rondeau Provincial Park hold a festival each March to celebrate this sign of spring.
This year we had reasonable weather and birds at the same time. Often the weather is so bad you can't see the birds, or the have already passed through the area.
It was nice to have a large number of people see these birds and to have a chance to photograph them.

Cugnus columbianus.

One thousand three hundred and nine, one thousand three hundred an ten.....

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One thousand three hundred and nine, one thousand three hundred an ten....., a photo by ricmcarthur on Flickr. Literally thousands of gulls lifted off at the same time creating this counting puzzle.
The Wings of Spring Festival of Flight was held this past weekend at Rondeau Provincial Park to celebrate the return of the tundra swans and waterfowl to the area.
As part of the activities we set up spotting scopes for the public to use.
While looking at the waterfowl and tundra swans thousands of gulls, mainly Bonaparte's, lifted off together.

How do you count a flock this big and constantly in motion? You guess.
This is only a portion of the birds that were in the air.
My guess is three thousand seven hundred and fifty one, fifty two, fifty three.....

Reflecting

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Reflecting, a photo by ricmcarthur on Flickr. This great egret was frozen watching for small fish to come within striking distance.
Ardea alba

Great Kiskadee

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Great Kiskadee, a photo by ricmcarthur on Flickr. The name reminds of of magicians, The GREAT KISKADEE appearing nightly at the Blue Bird Cafe.

This is a large, big headed flycatcher..It has a bright rufous tail and dark patches through its eyes. Pale yellow underneath.
It is a name sayer - its call sounds like
kee-ZEE-ick.


Pitangus sulphuratus

The back door

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The back door, a photo by ricmcarthur on Flickr. We always see the water side of the Sydney Opera House which is very impressive.
This is the back door, the land side where the stairs, buss stops and deliveries take place.

Looking in the mirror

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Looking in the mirror, a photo by ricmcarthur on Flickr. Seeing double or checking himself out in the mirror?

Two yellow warblers in our little pond last summer.

Dendroica petechia

Was it something Isaid?

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Was it something Isaid?, a photo by ricmcarthur on Flickr. Where did everyone go?

Cassowary

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Cassowary, a photo by ricmcarthur on Flickr. We saw these ostrich sized birds in the wild in Australia a few years ago.
This one was at the Brownsville, Texas zoo.
They are capable of killing a person by kicking and using the middle toe to slice them open.
The bird is very territorial and they will actually stalk anything the see as a threat.

Coming soon to a meadow near you.

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Coming soon to a meadow near you., a photo by ricmcarthur on Flickr. These are purple cone flowers growing in our yard.
When we moved here we took out all the grass in the front yard and planted a tall grass meadow.
I don't have to water it, cut it or fertilize it and it's great for birds and small critters.
Later in the summer we get numerous species of butterflies feeding.

Soon, I hope.

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Soon, I hope., a photo by ricmcarthur on Flickr. Looking forward to the spring migration when the warblers come through our area.
This is a black throated green warbler, one of my favourites because it is easy to identify visually or vocally.
Dendroica virens

That's fine but where do you park the car?

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That's fine but where do you park the car?, a photo by ricmcarthur on Flickr. I like signs. Poor wording, unexpected subjects or cultural differences all can make for a good sign.
Evidently this is where you put diabled drivers, but whee do you park the car?

We have lift off.

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We have lift off., a photo by ricmcarthur on Flickr. Wind surfers were out in early April last year. The bay is still frozen so I don't think they will be out anytime soon.
I don't think I'm interested in water sports with 40 degree air and water temperature.

If its size doesn't intimidate you the look will.

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If its size doesn't intimidate you the look will., a photo by ricmcarthur on Flickr.
The great-tailed grackle is about 18 inches. It is a very large,purple-glossed blackbird and is much larger than the common grackle.

Quiscalus mexicanus